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Human habitation of the Australian continent is estimated to have begun between 42,000 and 48,000 years ago, possibly with the migration of people by land bridges and short sea-crossings from what is now South-East Asia. These first inhabitants may have been ancestors of modern Indigenous Australians. At the time of European settlement in the late 18th century, most Indigenous Australians were hunter-gatherers, with a complex oral culture and spiritual values based on reverence for the land and a belief in the Dream time. The Torres Strait Islanders, ethnically Melanesian, were originally horticulturalists and hunter-gatherers. The northern coasts and waters of Australia were visited sporadically by fishermen from Maritime Southeast Asia.

The first recorded European sighting of the Australian mainland, and the first recorded European landfall on the Australian continent, are attributed to the Dutch navigator Willem Janszoon. He sighted the coast of Cape York Peninsula in early 1606, and made landfall on 26 February at the Penne father River near the modern town of Weipa on Cape York. The Dutch charted the whole of the western and northern coastlines and named the island continent "New Holland" during the 17th century, but made no attempt at settlement. William Dampier, an English explorer and privateer, landed on the north-west coast of New Holland in 1688 and again in 1699 on a return trip. In 1770,James Cook sailed along and mapped the east coast, which he named New South Wales and claimed for Great Britain. With the loss of its American colonies in 1780, the British Government sent a fleet of ships, the "First Fleet", under the command of Captain Arthur Phillip, to establish a new penal colony in New South Wales. A camp was set up and the flag raised at Sydney Cove, Port Jackson, on 26 January 1788, a date which became Australia's national day, Day although the British Crown Colony of New South Wales was not formally promulgated until 7 February 1788. The first settlement led to the foundation oAustralia has six states—New South Wales (NSW), Queensland (QLD), South Australia (SA),Tasmania (TAS), Victoria (VIC) and Western Australia (WA)—and two major mainland territories—the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and the Northern Territory (NT). In most respects these two territories function as states, but the Commonwealth Parliament can override any legislation of their parliaments. By contrast, federal legislation overrides state legislation only in areas that are set out in Section 51 of the Australian Constitution; state parliaments retain all residual legislative powers, including those over schools, state police, the state judiciary, roads, public transport and local government, since these do not fall under the provisions listed in Section 51.

Each state and major mainland territory has its own parliament—unicameral in the Northern Territory, the ACT and Queensland—and bicameral in the other states. The states are sovereign entities, although subject to certain powers of the Commonwealth as defined by the Constitution. The lower houses are known as the Legislative Assembly (the House of Assemblyin South Australia and Tasmania); the upper houses are known as the Legislative Council. Thehead of the government in each state is the Premier and in each territory the Chief Minister. TheQueen is represented in each state by a Governor; and in the Northern Territory, theAdministrator. In the Commonwealth, the Queen's representative is the Governor-General.[113]


The federal parliament directly administers the following territories:[91]


•Ashmore and Cartier Islands

•Australian Antarctic Territory

•Christmas Island

•Cocos (Keeling) Islands

•Coral Sea Islands

•Heard Island and McDonald Islands

•Jervis Bay Territory, a naval base and sea port for the national capital in land that was formerly part of New South Wales


Norfolk Island is also technically an external territory; however, under the Norfolk Island Act 1979 it has been granted more autonomy and is governed locally by its own legislative assembly. The Queen is represented by an Administrator, currently Owen Walsh. f Sydney, the establishment of farming, industry and commerce; and the exploration and settlement of other regions.

A British settlement was established in Van Diemen's Land, now known as Tasmania, in 1803 and it became a separate colony in 1825. The United Kingdom formally claimed the western part of Western (the Swan River Colony) in 1828. Separate colonies were carved from parts of New South Wales: South Australia in 1836, Victoria in 1851, and Queensland in 1859. The Northern was founded in 1911 when it was excised from South Australia. South Australia was founded as a "free province"—it was never a penal colony. Victoria and Western Australia were also founded "free", but later accepted transported convicts. A campaign by the settlers of New South Wales led to the end of convict transportation to that colony; the last convict ship arrived in 1848.

The indigenous population, estimated to have been between 750,000 and 1,000,000 at the time European settlement began, declined for 150 years following settlement, mainly due to infectious disease. A government policy of "assimilation" beginning with the Aboriginal Protection Act 1869 resulted in the removal of many Aboriginal children from their families and communities—often referred to as the Stolen Generations—a practice which may also have contributed to the decline in the indigenous population. The Federal government gained the power to make laws with respect to Aborigines following the 1967 referendum. Traditional ownership of land—aboriginal title—was not recognized until 1992, when the High Court case Mabo v Queensland (No 2)overturned the legal doctrine that Australia had been terra nullius ("land belonging to no one") before the European occupation.

A gold rush began in Australia in the early 1850sand the Eureka Rebellion against mining license fees in 1854 was an early expression of civil disobedience. Between 1855 and 1890, the six colonies individually gained responsible government, managing most of their own affairs while remaining part of the British Empire. The Colonial Office in London retained control of some matters, notably foreign affairs, defense, and international shipping.

On 1 January 1901, federation of the colonies was achieved after a decade of planning, consultation and voting. The Commonwealth of Australia was established and it became a dominion of the British Empire in 1907. The Federal Capital Territory (later renamed the Australian Capital Territory) was formed in 1911 as the location for the future federal capital of Canberra. Melbourne was the temporary seat of government from 1901 to 1927 while Canberra was being constructed. The Northern Territory was transferred from the control of the South Australian government to the federal parliament in 1911. In 1914, Australia joined Britain in fighting World War I, with support from both the outgoing Commonwealth Liberal Party and the incoming Australian Labor Party. Australians took part in many of the major battles fought on the Western Front. Of about 416,000 who served, about 60,000 were killed and another 152,000 were wounded. Many Australians regard the defeat of the Australian (ANZACs) at Gallipoli as the birth of the nation—its first major military action The Kokoda Track campaign is regarded by many as an analogous nation-defining event during World. Britain's Statute of Westminster 1931 formally ended most of the constitutional links between Australia and the UK. Australia adopted it in 1942, but it was backdated to 1939 to confirm the validity of legislation passed by the Australian Parliament during World War II. The shock of the United Kingdom's defeat in Asia in 1942 and the threat of Japanese invasion caused Australia to turn to the United States as a new ally and protector. Since 1951, Australia has been a formal military ally of the US, under the ANZUS treaty. After World War II Australia encouraged immigration from Europe. Since the 1970s and following the abolition of the White Australia policy, immigration from Asia and elsewhere was also promoted. As a result, Australia's demography, culture, and self-image were transformed. The final constitutional ties between Australia and the UK were severed with the passing of the Australia Act 1986, ending any British role in the government of the Australian States, and closing the option of judicial appeals to the Privy Council in London. In a 1999 referendum, 55% of voters and a majority in every state rejected a proposal to become a republic with a president appointed by a two-thirds vote in both Houses of the Australian Parliament. Since the election of the Whitlam Government in 1972, there has been an increasing focus in foreign policy on ties with other Pacific Rim nations, while maintaining close ties with Australia's traditional allies and trading partners.

Capital

Canberra

Largest City

Sydney

Languages

English

Area

7,692,024 Km2 (6th)
2,969,907 Sq Mi

Population

23,371,899[5] (52nd)

Currency

Australian Dollar (AUD)

Drivers on the

Left

Calling Code

61

HISTORY

STATES AND TERRITORIES

Australia's size gives it a wide variety of landscapes, with subtropical rainforests in the north-east, mountain ranges in the south-east, south-west and east, and dry desert in the centre. It is the flattest continent, with the oldest and least fertile soils; desert or semi-arid land commonly known as the outback makes up by far the largest portion of land. The driest inhabited continent, only its south-east and south-west corners have a temperate climate. The population density, 2.8 inhabitants per square kilometre, is among the lowest in the world, although a large proportion of the population lives along the temperate south-eastern coastline.

Eastern Australia is marked by the Great Dividing Range, which runs parallel to the coast of Queensland, New South Wales and much of Victoria. The name is not strictly accurate, because parts of the range consist of low hills, and the highlands are typically no more than 1,600 metres (5,249 ft) in height. The coastal uplands and abelt of Brigalow grasslands lie between the coast and the mountains, while inland of the dividing range are large areas of grassland. These include the western plains of New South Wales, and the Einasleigh Uplands,Barkly Tableland, and Mulga Lands of inland Queensland. The northernmost point of the east coast is the tropical-rainforested Cape York Peninsula.

The landscapes of the northern part of the country—the Top End and the Gulf Country behind the Gulf of Carpentaria, with their tropical climate—consist of woodland, grassland, and desert. At the north-west corner of the continent are the sandstone cliffs and gorges of The Kimberley, and below that the Pilbara. To the south of these and inland, lie more areas of grassland: the Ord Victoria Plain and the Western Australian Mulga shrublands. At the heart of the country are the uplands of central Australia; prominent features of the centre and south include the inland Simpson, Tirari and Sturt Stony, Gibson, Great Sandy, Tanami, and Great Victoria deserts, with the famous Nullarbor Plain on the southern coast. The climate of Australia is significantly influenced by ocean currents, including the Indian Ocean Dipole and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation, which is correlated with periodic drought, and the seasonal tropical low-pressure system that produces cyclones in northern Australia. These factors cause rainfall to vary markedly from year to year. Much of the northern part of the country has a tropical, predominantly summer-rainfall (monsoon) climate. The southwest corner of the country has a Mediterranean climate. Much of the southeast (including Tasmania) is temperate.

Australia's landmass of 7,617,930 square kilometers (2,941,300 sq mi) is on the Indo-Australian Plate. Surrounded by the Indian and Pacific oceans, it is separated from Asia by the Arafura and Timor seas, with the Coral lying off the Queensland coast, and the Tasman Sea lying between Australia and New Zealand. The world's smallest continent and sixth largest country by total area, Australia—owing to its size and isolation—is often dubbed the "island continent", and is sometimes considered the world's largest island. Australia has 34,218 kilometers (21,262 mi) of coastline (excluding all offshore islands), and claims an extensive Exclusive Economic Zone of 8,148,250 square kilometers (3,146,060 sq mi). This exclusive economic zone does not include the Australian Antarctic Territory. Excluding Macquarie Island, Australia lies between latitudes 9° and 44°S, and longitudes 112° and 154°E.

The Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest coral reef, and lies a short distance off the north-east coast and extends for over 2,000 kilometres (1,240 mi). Mount Augustus, claimed to be the world's largest monolith, is located in Western Australia. At 2,228 metres (7,310 ft), Mount Kosciuszko on the Great Dividing Range is the highest mountain on the Australian mainland. Even taller are Mawson Peak (at 2,745 metres or 9,006 feet), on the remote Australian territory of Heard Island, and, in the Australian Antarctic Territory, Mount McClintock and Mount Menzies, at 3,492 metres (11,457 ft) and 3,355 metres (11,007 ft) respectively.

GEOGRAPHY AND CLIMATE

Although most of Australia is semi-arid or desert, it includes a diverse range of habitats from alpine heaths to tropical rainforests, and is recognized as amegadiverse country. The fungi typify that diversity; the total number that occur in Australia, including those not yet discovered, has been estimated at around 250,000 species, of which roughly 5% have been described. Because of the continent's great age, extremely variable weather patterns, and long-term geographic isolation, much of Australia's biota is unique and diverse. Approximately 85% of flowering plants, 84% of mammals, more than 45% of birds, and 89% of in-shore, temperate-zone fish are endemic. Australia has the greatest number of reptiles of any country, with 755 species.

Australian forests are mostly made up of evergreen species, particularly eucalyptus trees in the less arid regions, wattles replace them in drier regions and deserts as the most dominant species. Among well-knownAustralian animals are the monodramas (the platypus and echidna); a host of marsupials, including the kangaroo,koala, and wombat, and birds such as the emu and the kookaburra. Australia is home to many dangerous animals including some of the most venomous snakes in the world. The dingo was introduced by Austronesia people who traded with Indigenous Australians around 3000 BCE. Many animal and plant species became extinct soon after first human settlement, including the Australian mega fauna; others have disappeared since European settlement, among them the ethylamine.

Many of Australia's ecoregions, and the species within those regions, are threatened by human activities and introduced animal, chromatin, fungal and plant species. The federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 is the legal framework for the protection of threatened species. Numerous protected areas have been created under the National Strategy for the Conservation of Australia's Biological Diversity to protect and preserve unique ecosystems; 65 wetlands are listed under the Ramseur Convention, and 16 natural World Heritage Sites have been established. Australia was ranked 51st of 163 countries in the world on the 2010 Environmental Performance Index.

Climate change has become an increasing concern in Australia in recent years, and protection of the environment is a major political issue. In 2007, the First Rudd Government signed the instrument of ratification of the Kyoto Protocol. Nevertheless, Australia's carbon dioxide emissions per capita are among the highest in the world, lower than those of only a few other industrialized nations. Rainfall in Australia has slightly increased over the past century, both nationwide and for two quadrants of the nation, According to the Bureau of Meteorology's 2011 Australian Climate Statement, Australia had lower than average temperatures in 2011 as a consequence of a La Niña weather pattern, however, "the country's 10-year average continues to demonstrate the rising trend in temperatures, with 2002–2011 likely to rank in the top two warmest 10-year periods on record for Australia, at 0.52 °C above the long-term average". Water restrictions are frequently in place in many regions and cities of Australia in response to chronic shortages due to urban population increases and localized drought. Throughout much of the continent, major flooding regularly follows extended periods of drought, flushing out inland river systems, overflowing dams and inundating large inland flood plains, as occurred throughout Eastern Australia in 2010, 2011 and 2012 after the 2000s Australian drought.

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

The Super Pit gold mine in Kalgoorlie, Australia's largest open cut mine.[198]

Australia is a wealthy country with a market economy, a relatively high GDP per capita, and a relatively low rate of poverty. In terms of average wealth, Australia ranked second in the world after Switzerland in 2013, and the nation's poverty rate increased from 10.2 per cent to 11.8 per cent, from 2000/01 to 2013. It was identified by the Credit Suisse Research Institute as the nation with the highest median wealth in the world and the second-highest average wealth per adult in 2013.

The Australian dollar is the currency for the nation, including Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, and Norfolk Island, as well as the independent Pacific Island states of Kiribati, Nauru, and Tuvalu. With the 2006 merger of the Australian Stock Exchange and the Sydney Futures Exchange, the Australian Securities Exchangebecame the ninth largest in the world.

Ranked third in the Index of Economic Freedom (2010), Australia is the world's twelfth largest economy and has the fifth highest per capita GDP (nominal) at $66,984. The country was ranked second in the United Nations 2011 Human Development Index and first in Legatum's 2008 Prosperity Index. All of Australia's major cities fare well in global comparative livability surveys; Melbourne reached first place on The Economist's 2011, 2012 and 2013 world's most livable cities lists, followed by Sydney, Perth, and Adelaide in sixth, eighth, and ninth place respectively. Total government debt in Australia is about $190 billion– 20% of GDP in 2010. Australia has among the highest house prices and some of the highest household-debt levels in the world.

The Holden VF Commodore. Holden, together with Ford and Toyota spearheadAustralia's automotive industry.

An emphasis on exporting commodities rather than manufactured goods has underpinned a significant increase in Australia's terms of trade since the start of the 21st century, due to rising commodity prices.Australia has a balance of payments that is more than 7% of GDP negative, and has had persistently largecurrent account deficits for more than 50 years. Australia has grown at an average annual rate of 3.6% for over 15 years; in comparison to the OECD annual average of 2.5%.Australia was the only advanced economy not to experience a recession due to the global financial downturn in 2008–2009. However, the economies of six of Australia's major trading partners have been in recession, which in turn has affected Australia, significantly hampering its economic growth in recent years. From 2012 to early 2013, Australia's national economy grew, but some non-mining states and Australia's non-mining economy experienced a recession.

The Hawke Government floated the Australian dollar in 1983 and partially deregulated the financial system. The Howard Government followed with apartial deregulation of the labour market and the further privatisation of state-owned businesses, most notably in the telecommunications industry. The indirect tax system was substantially changed in July 2000 with the introduction of a 10% Goods and Services Tax (GST). In Australia's tax system, personal and company income tax are the main sources of government revenue.

In May 2012, there were 11,537,900 people employed (either full- or part-time), with an unemployment rate of 5.1%.Youth unemployment (15–24) stood at 11.2%.Data released in mid-November 2013 showed that the number of welfare recipients had grown by 55%. In 2007 228,621 Newstart unemployment allowance recipients were registered, a total that increased to 646,414 in March 2013.

Over the past decade, inflation has typically been 2–3% and the base interest rate 5–6%. The service sector of the economy, including tourism, education, and financial services, accounts for about 70% of GDP. Rich in natural resources, Australia is a major exporter of agricultural products, particularly wheat and wool, minerals such as iron-ore and gold, and energy in the forms of liquified natural gas and coal. Although agriculture and natural resources account for only 3% and 5% of GDP respectively, they contribute substantially to export performance. Australia's largest export markets are Japan, China, the US, South Korea, and New Zealand. Australia is the world's fourth largest exporter of wine, and the wine industry contributes $5.5 billion per year to the nation's economy.

RELIGION

PERCENT

Roman Catholic

25.30%

Anglican

17.10%

Other Christian

18.70%

Buddhism

2.50%

Islam

2.20%

Hinduism

1.30%

Judaism

0.50%

Other

0.80%

No religion


22.30%

Undefined or

not stated

9.40%

School attendance or registration for home schooling is compulsory throughout Australia. Education is the responsibility of the individual states and territories so the rules vary between states, but in general children are required to attend school from the age of about 5 up until about 16. In some states (e.g., WA, NT & NSW children aged 16–17 are required to either attend school or participate in vocational training, such as an apprenticeship.

Australia has an adult literacy rate that was estimated to be 99% in 2003. However, a 2011–12 report for the Australian Bureau of Statistics reported that Tasmania has a literacy and numeracy rate of only 50%. In the Programmers for International Student Assessment, Australia regularly scores among the top five of thirty major developed countries (member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development). Catholic education accounts for the largest non-government sector.

Australia has 37 government-funded universities and two private universities, as well as a number of other specialist institutions that provide approved courses at the higher education level. The University of Sydney is Australia's oldest university, having been founded in 1850, followed by the University of Melbourne three years later. Other notable universities include those of the Group of Eight leading tertiary institutions, including the University of Adelaide(which boasts an association with five Nobel Laureates), the Australian National University located in the national capital of Canberra, Monash University and the University of New South Wales.

The OECD places Australia among the most expensive nations to attend university. There is a state-based system of vocational training, known as TAFE, and many trades conduct apprenticeships for training new trades people. Approximately 58% of Australians aged from 25 to 64 have vocational or tertiary qualifications, and the tertiary graduation rate of 49% is the highest among OECD countries. The ratio of international to local students in tertiary education in Australia is the highest in the OECD countries.

EDUCATION

Australia has the fourth highest life expectancy in the world after Iceland, Japan and Hong Kong. Life expectancy in Australia in 2010 was 79.5 years for males and 84.0 years for females. Australia has the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, while cigarette smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease, responsible for 7.8% of the total mortality and disease. Ranked second in preventable causes is hypertension at 7.6%, with obesity third at 7.5%. Australia ranks 35th in the world and near the top of developed nations for its proportion of obese adults.

Total expenditure on health (including private sector spending) is around 9.8% of GDP. Australia introduced universal health care in 1975. Known as Medicare, it is now nominally funded by an income tax surcharge known as the Medicare levy, currently set at 1.5%.the states manage hospitals and attached outpatient services, while the Commonwealth funds the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (subsidizing the costs of medicines) and general practice.

HEALTH

Australia

Australia has six states—New South Wales (NSW), Queensland (QLD), South Australia (SA),Tasmania (TAS), Victoria (VIC) and Western Australia (WA)—and two major mainland territories—the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and the Northern Territory (NT). In most respects these two territories function as states, but the Commonwealth Parliament can override any legislation of their parliaments. By contrast, federal legislation overrides state legislation only in areas that are set out in Section 51 of the Australian Constitution; state parliaments retain all residual legislative powers, including those over schools, state police, the state judiciary, roads, public transport and local government, since these do not fall under the provisions listed in Section 51.

Each state and major mainland territory has its own parliament—unicameral in the Northern Territory, the ACT and Queensland—and bicameral in the other states. The states are sovereign entities, although subject to certain powers of the Commonwealth as defined by the Constitution. The lower houses are known as the Legislative Assembly (the House of Assemblyin South Australia and Tasmania); the upper houses are known as the Legislative Council. Thehead of the government in each state is the Premier and in each territory the Chief Minister. TheQueen is represented in each state by a Governor; and in the Northern Territory, theAdministrator. In the Commonwealth, the Queen's representative is the Governor-General.[113]

The federal parliament directly administers the following territories:[91]

•Ashmore and Cartier Islands

•Australian Antarctic Territory

•Christmas Island

•Cocos (Keeling) Islands

•Coral Sea Islands

•Heard Island and McDonald Islands

•Jervis Bay Territory, a naval base and sea port for the national capital in land that was formerly part of New South Wales


Norfolk Island is also technically an external territory; however, under the Norfolk Island Act 1979 it has been granted more autonomy and is governed locally by its own legislative assembly. The Queen is represented by an Administrator, currently Owen Walsh.

UNIVERSITIES

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) is a highly successful Australian university with an applied emphasis in courses and research. Based in Brisbane,

Ozford is committed to providing quality educational programs for students to achieve their educational and personal goals and embrace lifelong learning.

Philosophy

Ozford is committed to providing quality educational programs for students to achieve their

educational and personal goals and embrace lifelong learning. Ozford fosters a personalized

environment where students can develop skills and values to enable them to participate effectively

in their chosen career field and the wider community.


Our Purpose

Our purpose is to create an innovative educational institution in the heart of Melbourne

with the best possible opportunities offered to students to excel academically and maximize their potential.


Our Vision

Our vision is to provide every student with the opportunity to practise skills attained by undertaking

real life learning based on global needs and values. Our dedicated staff provide a

student-focused approach to ensure a supportive, individualized and innovative learning experience.


Ozford is committed to the achievement of excellence in education. A student’s success is Ozford’s success.

Our Values


Unity

We work together to achieve our vision, mission and objectives.


Passion

We are passionately committed to delivering quality educational experiences and expanding all learners’ horizons.


Excellence

We strive for the highest quality in every aspect of our work.


Respect

We respect all our clients and stakeholders by providing a caring Ozford community based on openness,

fairness and friendship. At Ozford we recognize that with rights come responsibilities to ourselves, our clients and our stakeholders.


Integrity

We act responsibly and honestly in all we do.


Diversity

We promote intercultural awareness and understanding through authentic

experiences both within the Ozford community and the broader Australian and global community

ENGLISH COURSES

DURATION

General English

10 to 40 Weeks

IELTS Test Preparation

10 Weeks

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

10 Weeks

English for Secondary School Preparation

10 to 40 Weeks

English for TESOL Preparation

12 Weeks

Business English*

5 to 10 Weeks

English for Young Learners*

Minimum 2 Weeks

COURSES

UNIVERSITY PATHWAYS

Ozford provides quality education to enter Australian universities:


University pathways - advanced standing credit transfer of 1 year or more for Ozford VET


Diploma and Advanced Diploma courses into relevant university Degree programs.

    

  • For more credit transfer information click on the University logo below the diagram     
  • Ozford English language and Ozford High School year 12 entry to university

ACCOUNTING

BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

COMMUNITY SERVICES

HOSPITALITY

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

LANGUAGE STUDIES

MARKETING

TEACHING

  • Certificate IV in Accounting
  • Diploma of Accounting
  • Advanced Diploma of Accounting
  • Certificate II in Business
  • Certificate III in Business
  • Certificate IV in Frontline Management
  • Certificate IV in Business
  • Diploma of Business
  • Diploma of Management
  • Advanced Diploma of Management
  • Certificate III in Children's Services
  • Diploma of Children's Services

   (Early childhood education and care)

  • Certificate II in Hospitality
  • Certificate II in Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)
  • Certificate III in Hospitality
  • Certificate III in Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)
  • Certificate III in Hospitality (Patisserie)
  • Certificate IV in Hospitality
  • Certificate IV in Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)
  • Certificate IV in Hospitality (Patisserie)
  • Diploma of Hospitality
  • Certificate IV in Information Technology  Networking
  • Certificate IV in Digital Media Technologies
  • Diploma of Digital Media Technologies
  • Diploma of Information Technology Networking
  • Certificate IV in EAL (Further Study)
  • Certificate IV in Marketing
  • Diploma of Marketing
  • Certificate IV in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Certificate IV in Training and Assessment

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) is a highly successful Australian university with an applied emphasis in courses and research. Based in Brisbane, the university has a global outlook, some 42,000 students, including 6000 from overseas, and an annual budget of more than AU$750 million.

Courses are in high demand and its graduate employment rate is well above the national average for Australian universities.


This section details QUT's rich past, its performance-focused present and exciting future:


  • Staff                                   4,349
  • Student to staff ratio    24.5 students for each teaching staff   member

COURSES

  • Science and mathematics courses
  • Law and justice courses
  • Information technology courses
  • Health and community courses
  • English language courses
  • Engineering courses
  • Education courses
  • Creative, design and performance courses
  • Building and planning courses
  • Business
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Malaysia

Malaysia

Australia

Australia

Germany

Germany

India

India

Dubai

Dubai

Singapore

Singapore

New Zealand

New Zealand